The Mutt’s Nuts

Where religion is about as attractive as a two week holiday in Afghanistan

The Illusion of Free Choice

with 24 comments

Christians will tell you that God provides freedom of choice to individuals, which makes them responsible for the consequences of their actions. For example, we are free to choose whether to believe in God or not; to keep his commandments or violate them; to head for heaven or slide down to hell. This choice is sometimes put in the simplest of terms – choosing good or evil. Good, of course, is defined as God-approved, while evil means anything that is in opposition to God’s will.

The problem with this idea of free choice is that it is purely illusory. It requires people to make a choice only within a prescribed framework . For example, we are told that we can either keep God’s commandments or break God’s commandments. Keeping God’s commandments is the “good” choice, the “right” choice. Breaking God’s commandments is the “bad” or “wrong” choice. But the fact is, there is only one set of commandments to choose from and they have been designed by God. Where is the opportunity to decide that, in certain situations, different behaviours are more appropriate or morally benign? What if you want to decide your own morality, based on your own sense of right and wrong, so you discard God’s commandments and create an individual moral code that suits you and harms no-one?

Limiting choices to within a framework which assures the framer the result he desires, cannot be called “free”. It’s like a mother telling a child she can only choose to wear the red dress or the blue dress, because those are the dresses the mother likes best. There’s no option to choose the green dress or the yellow dress. Nor, for that matter, is there the chance to wear a tee shirt and jeans, or a blouse and skirt. In the same way, God limits our options to ensure that our choices correspond to his own predetermined outcomes for us.

Freedom of choice is also illusory when the person making the choice is given no clear idea of the consequences of his decision. Christians will tell you that if you do this you’ll go to heaven and if you do that you’ll go to hell. They witter on about peace and happiness, fire and torment, but you won’t get a clear description of what an eternity of heaven or hell will actually consist of. The trouble is, apparently no human has actually been to either place and returned to give us a full-blown account of their adventure. It’s a bit like the promise that Hank will give you a million dollars when you leave town but, although plenty of people have left town, no-one has ever returned with stories of the huge spending spree they’ve been on with Hank’s million dollars. To have real freedom of choice you must comprehend as clearly as possible what the results of your choice will be.

And while we’re on the subject, portraying the consequences of our choices in terms of reward or punishment is surely a matter of enticement, rather than the offer of free choice. Just as we are influenced, albeit unconsciously in many instances, by advertising, fashion, or popular opinion, so God influences our choices by manipulating our feelings about where we we would want to spend eternity (always supposing we accept the idea of life after death). If he were to include a third option, for those people who don’t necessarily want to live with him, but whom it would be unjust to punish with endless hellfire, at least the alternatives would be somewhat fairer than a simple happiness versus misery scenario. After all, no-one would choose to live in endless misery, so making that one of only two options is to weight the odds very strongly on the side of choosing the path that leads to heaven. However you look at it, that smacks of blackmail.

Probably one of the most important aspects in making a genuine choice is having the ability to act on reliable, verifiable information. You don’t just need to know what the options are, you need to be certain that they’re real. Imagine a man comes to your door and tells you he has a car for sale. It’s just what you’re looking for, it’s in perfect condition and at a very reasonable price. Probably one of the first things you would want to know is when you can see it. How would you feel if the man told you that he couldn’t actually show it to you, but he had a picture of it? Would that be sufficient for you to hand over your money? How about if he produced a written statement by someone who had seen the car, confirming everything that the man was telling you about it? I’m guessing that unless you could actually have a good look at the vehicle, perhaps even getting a qualified mechanic to check it over, and taking it for a test drive yourself, you would tell the man at the door to take his proposition elsewhere.

Christians will tell you that you need to accept Jesus as your personal saviour and that, if you don’t, you will go to hell. But where is the proof that Jesus even existed, or that he was who he said he was? Prior to the time Jesus allegedly lived, there were many stories of mythical saviour figures bearing strong similarities to the story of Jesus contained in the gospels. Being told that you have to accept some historical myth on faith alone is hardly a strong foundation for making an accurate choice. Just as you wouldn’t accept a stranger’s word for the fact that he had a fantastic car for sale without verification of its existence and reliability, so it would be foolish to accept the need to conform your life to the urgings of a religious believer without corroborating evidence of the product he is peddling.

Some might say that, to be convinced of the reality of Jesus as the son of God and saviour of the world, you must set aside your scepticism and open your heart to belief. That only the holy spirit can confirm the truth of spiritual things. But why should you be expected to make life or death decisions based on emotions and desires rather than on concrete facts? That is no foundation for wise choices in matters that have far-reaching consequences.

No, the claim by Christians that God allows people the freedom to choose to follow him or not is bogus. Without being able to choose options that are unlimited by a framework that manipulates the outcome to achieve the framer’s desired result; in the absence of the fullest details about the consequences of the choices to be made; and without verifiable information about the reality of the options apparently available to you, freedom of choice is just an illusion.

IslaSkye

About these ads

Written by islaskye

December 3, 2007 at 12:43 pm

24 Responses

Subscribe to comments with RSS.

  1. Cool article IslaSkye – hey, we got the same name ;-)

    islaskye

    December 6, 2007 at 4:11 pm

  2. This could get confusing!

    islaskye

    December 7, 2007 at 8:24 am

  3. No, not really. I’m more of a pussy cat than a scratchy cat (no offence intended). Enjoy reading you ;-)

    islaskye

    December 7, 2007 at 4:10 pm

  4. Interesting article. I found this page by it being put on the StumbleUpon listings.

    As someone who believes in God, I would just like to offer a reply or comment on this blog entry. For the purpose of my argument, I just want to use a parent/child relationship as an analogy between us and God.

    So when you say free will is not so free when we’re in a sense under obligation to choose in God’s framework, and that what’s freer is for us to choose our own framework, I see it as like a young man choosing whether to take on their family business in the safety of the family, or go off to make a name for himself in the outside world. The thing that you’ll be disappointed to know is that for us there is no outside world. For us, God made the universe and made his own rules to govern it well. We can’t escape moral laws any more than we can escape the law of gravity. Sure, anyone can say that I define my own morality, but they have no power to make reality. In a parent’s house, we are given life, they nurture us, etc. So out of God’s blessings, we are alive and living. When people live lives saying that God’s morality doesn’t apply to them, it’s as delusional as a rebellious teenager who hates his parents and says he doesn’t need them, yet takes the allowance money his dad puts on his desk every week and eats his mom’s food every night.

    Mike

    December 10, 2007 at 11:49 pm

  5. In the same way, God limits our options to ensure that our choices correspond to his own predetermined outcomes for us.

    What is there but right and wrong?
    You can obey or disobey. What else is there?

    but you won’t get a clear description of what an eternity of heaven or hell will actually consist of.

    The Bible describes both places.

    The trouble is, apparently no human has actually been to either place and returned to give us a full-blown account of their adventure.

    Untrue. There is a book 90 minutes in Heaven which was written by a man who died and stayed dead for 90 minutes. It gets boring after the first few chapters.

    for those people who don’t necessarily want to live with him, but whom it would be unjust to punish with endless hellfire, at least the alternatives would be somewhat fairer than a simple happiness versus misery scenario.

    Name one person like that. You don’t like the idea, but if you don’t want to live with Him, then you don’t accept Him, and if you don’t accept Him, then your sin becomes eternal once you die, which means that you walk yourself into hell.

    But where is the proof that Jesus even existed, or that he was who he said he was?

    There is archaeological evidence.

    Prior to the time Jesus allegedly lived, there were many stories of mythical saviour figures bearing strong similarities to the story of Jesus contained in the gospels.

    The gospels only speak of one Savior.

    so it would be foolish to accept the need to conform your life to the urgings of a religious believer without corroborating evidence of the product he is peddling.

    Why? What harm could be done?

    But why should you be expected to make life or death decisions based on emotions and desires rather than on concrete facts?

    You aren’t. You are expected to open your mind and consider.

    No, the claim by Christians that God allows people the freedom to choose to follow him or not is bogus. Without being able to choose options that are unlimited by a framework that manipulates the outcome to achieve the framer’s desired result; in the absence of the fullest details about the consequences of the choices to be made; and without verifiable information about the reality of the options apparently available to you, freedom of choice is just an illusion.

    What framework?
    And Hell and Heaven were described well enough. Think about it, Heaven is the only one that needs description, and it was described. Hell, on the other hand, can be described as this: If you sin, you have to pay for it, and when you die, your sin becomes eternal (unless you allow God’s offer to take it from you), and when your sin becomes eternal, then you have an eternal sin to pay for, and that means you pay for that sin eternally.

    Twelve

    December 18, 2007 at 12:11 am

  6. Mike

    It is only your belief that:

    God made the universe and made his own rules to govern it well.

    There is absolutely no proof of this at all.

    You say that God’s morality applies to all of us, whether we like it or not. Well, the morality of the God that appears in the Bible is the morality of Middle Eastern peoples who lived several thousand years ago. The Bible God endorses murder, slavery, torture, xenophobia and the subjugation of women. These are all attitudes that enlightened people today abhor.

    I contend that the morality of ordinary people like you and me is far superior to that of the God described in the Bible, which is why I feel I am entitled to follow my own moral compass rather than the example of the Biblical God.

    islaskye

    December 18, 2007 at 7:40 pm

  7. Twelve,

    Archaeological evidence? Pray, do tell?

    Aine

    December 18, 2007 at 8:48 pm

  8. Twelve

    You have clearly not understood the points I was making. I’m not sure I can make them any clearer, so I’ll just try and address a few of your comments.

    You say:

    What is there but right and wrong?
    You can obey or disobey. What else is there?

    Any time someone gives you an either/or choice they are ensuring that you act within limits that they have set. Either you do what they tell you or you don’t. They are the one holding all the cards and you are forced to dance to their tune. That is not freedom.

    You said, referring to heaven and hell:

    The Bible describes both places.

    Please describe heaven and hell in detail for me, just as you would describe the place where you live – climate, surroundings, density of population, landmarks, culture, etc. Then please go on to detail exactly how the people in each place will spend their time, just as you would describe every activity you have participated in today.

    There is a book 90 minutes in Heaven which was written by a man who died and stayed dead for 90 minutes. It gets boring after the first few chapters.

    If the description of heaven is so boring, maybe the place itself isn’t all it’s cracked up to be? ;)

    You say there is archaeological evidence that Jesus existed and that he is who he said he was. What and where is that evidence and who has verified it?

    The gospels only speak of one Savior.

    I know that. I was making the point that mythologies from around the world all tell similar stories of saviour gods.

    You said:

    If you sin, you have to pay for it, and when you die, your sin becomes eternal (unless you allow God’s offer to take it from you), and when your sin becomes eternal, then you have an eternal sin to pay for, and that means you pay for that sin eternally.

    Making someone suffer eternally for an act that’s finite is totally unfair – can’t you see that?

    islaskye

    December 19, 2007 at 6:51 am

  9. Any time someone gives you an either/or choice they are ensuring that you act within limits that they have set. Either you do what they tell you or you don’t. They are the one holding all the cards and you are forced to dance to their tune. That is not freedom.

    But what limits are there? God is moral, and all that is moral is God, morality is not made up by God, rather, it IS God. You can either be for God, or against God, there is no middle line.

    Please describe heaven and hell in detail for me, just as you would describe the place where you live – climate, surroundings, density of population, landmarks, culture, etc.

    I already explained Hell, but as for Heaven.

    1. No sun; God provides (rather “is”) light.

    2. There need be no description of atmosphere, because we won’t need such things.

    3. It will not be crowded with people, as there is infinite room for us.

    4. The culture is that of righteousness, flawless morality.

    5. I doubt there are any landmarks.

    Then please go on to detail exactly how the people in each place will spend their time, just as you would describe every activity you have participated in today.

    Worshiping God in whatever way you please. Although that sounds boring, it isn’t when you consider the fact that you’ll be in God’s presence, and humans were, after all, created to love God and be loved by God.

    If the description of heaven is so boring, maybe the place itself isn’t all it’s cracked up to be?

    The description of Heaven was great, and quite interesting. The author only wrote a few chapters with the description of Heaven, and the rest of it was stuff that happened afterward, which was rather boring.

    You say there is archaeological evidence that Jesus existed and that he is who he said he was. What and where is that evidence and who has verified it?

    Research it. I don’t have the time, but you should do fine to find the information you need.

    I know that. I was making the point that mythologies from around the world all tell similar stories of saviour gods.

    But don’t forget the Old Testament, which prophesied and described Jesus long before He existed as a human.

    Making someone suffer eternally for an act that’s finite is totally unfair – can’t you see that?

    God isn’t making you suffer, though. He is allowing you to choose for yourself. When you die, if your sin becomes eternal, and unless you allowed Jesus to take the punishment for you, then you’ll have to pay for it yourself. God isn’t the one who punishes you, remember. Although your actions were finite, they become eternal once you die, as your sins stick with you even after death. The fact of the matter is you committed those acts, and you have to pay for them, but once the sins become eternal, you have to pay for those eternal sins, resulting in an eternal payment. It sounds unfair, but that is just life, and God is trying to help, but will not force you into Heaven, so He simply stands in Heaven, waiting and calling, trying to warn you not to go the wrong way. The decision is ultimately ours.

    Twelve

    December 20, 2007 at 4:35 am

  10. Twelve

    I think this has to be the end of our conversation. You’re just parroting the same old stuff and it’s really not getting us anywhere.

    Just one thing…

    In a previous comment you claimed that there was archeological evidence for the existence of Jesus Christ, but when I asked what and where it was, you replied:

    Research it. I don’t have the time, but you should do fine to find the information you need.

    As you are the one claiming that there is evidence, the onus is on you to present it, not on me to search for it. By refusing to produce it I’m guessing you don’t really have any. Please feel free to prove me wrong.

    islaskye

    December 20, 2007 at 6:44 pm

  11. islaskye,

    You are persistent not to look for the evidence yourself. It is Christmastime, and I am much to busy to find a website for you, but I’m sure that you can find it yourself. By the way you keep up this refusal, it appears that you are afraid to find that there really is evidence.
    Here’s just a small bit you might want to look into. The names of the kings of the Bible are carved into cave walls and such, dating back to the appropriate time. This gives evidence for many of the OT stories of kings. There are also sea fossils on the tops of mountains. As for Jesus’ existence, there are just archaeological records, but I just don’t have any time to research it for you. I’m using up too much time already typing up this comment, I’m sorry, but you’ll need to find out yourself.

    I think this has to be the end of our conversation. You’re just parroting the same old stuff and it’s really not getting us anywhere.

    I think this has to be the end of our conversation. You’re just parroting the same old stuff and it’s really not getting us anywhere.

    I am forced to “parrot” the same old things. You keep parroting your objections to them, but I keep defending them over and over in the same way. I’m answering you, but often I just need to repeat myself because you missed it the first time, and what are the chances of you reading my comments a second time?

    Twelve

    December 20, 2007 at 8:33 pm

  12. Twelve

    You are persistent not to look for the evidence yourself. It is Christmastime, and I am much to busy to find a website for you, but I’m sure that you can find it yourself.

    That’s okay. I know everyone’s busy this time of year. I’m happy to wait till after Christmas for you to produce this evidence that you claim exists.

    By the way you keep up this refusal, it appears that you are afraid to find that there really is evidence.

    And by the way you refuse to back up your claim that there is archaeological evidence for the existence of Jesus Christ, it appears that you are afraid that there really isn’t any evidence.

    islaskye

    December 22, 2007 at 9:04 am

  13. It doesn’t matter enough to me to hand over the evidence that Jesus existed, but it’s out there if it’s important to you. That doesn’t mean he was who he said he was, or who people thought he was. Then again, it doesn’t men he wasn’t. It’s like you said about Hank’s millions, we don’t know, and it’s unknowable, at least until we effectively leave town.

    But I agree with you that there are limitations on free will. It’s one of the first tricks mothers and teachers figure out. Without those limitations, life would be chaos, and probably for most people, not just the mothers and the teachers. If God exists, most people probably hope he gives a damn about us. He probably doesn’t want any more headaches himself. As someone who used to teach English comp to college freshmen, I can assure you that leaving the choice of topics wide open is not going to get the teacher the kind of paper he wants. Yes — the kind of paper he wants. If the kids don’t want to graduate from college, nobody’s keeping them in freshman comp. If people want to stay out of jail (we know they’re real), they try to stay inside the law. If people believe in heaven and hell, they try to follow what they’ve decided is God’s law.

    No, there’s no such thing as free will. But that doesn’t mean there is no such thing as choice.

    Snark

    February 22, 2008 at 9:02 pm

  14. Snark

    It doesn’t matter enough to me to hand over the evidence that Jesus existed, but it’s out there if it’s important to you.

    It’s not at all important to me. The reason I kept asking Twelve to produce it is because he made a claim that he clearly didn’t want to, or wasn’t able to, actually back up. I wasn’t going to let him off the hook and he didn’t like that.

    My remarks about free choice were only in the context of choosing whether or not to believe in and obey God. According to many Christians, if you make a choice that God doesn’t like – e.g. believing in the wrong God, or not believing in any God at all – he will punish you (and punish you most unfairly, IMO, too). This is why the argument that we are free to choose whether or not to accept God isn’t valid. Our choice would only be truly free if there was no enticement or discouragement one way or the other. If God said “Believe whatever you like, it’s entirely up to you, and I’ll honour your choice as an expression of your honest beliefs”, then fair enough. But, of course, it’s not like that.

    islaskye

    February 23, 2008 at 10:07 am

  15. You’ve managed to choose not to believe in God. ;) To be more honest, I’d have to call myself a “hopeful agnostic” — and I don’t believe in hell. It’s senseless. Purgatory makes more sense than hell, but couldn’t God just, *blip*, purify your soul on his own? I hope desperately that there’s an afterlife. For one thing, I want to see my grandmother again. The idea of seeing Memaw again is worth all sorts of intellectual backflips. I mean, I know it doesn’t make much sense. I just want it desperately.

    My idea of God is based on reason, imagination and desire. I’m not trying to sell it to other people. I certainly don’t believe in the petty God of the Old Testament and I don’t quite understand the need for Jesus to die senselessly. (I don’t understand the need for torture, period, but, I’m an American, so it’s probably dangerous to publish that information.)

    It’s just my personal lens to look at humanity through. I don’t claim it to be THE lens. My point is that intelligent people make a conscious choice about what they believe in. It’s not that most theists, or Christians in particular, are particularly intelligent or have made a conscious choice about how they see the world. I have, though.

    Snark

    February 23, 2008 at 5:33 pm

  16. This topic really moved me. I have had trouble with religion since about age 11. I quit going to church at 19, and that was close to 40 years ago. I still contemplate the notion of God, however. You could call me a closet non-believer. I prefer to avoid the social stigma in my country of “coming out” as an agnostic or atheist. OK, I don’t have the courage. And on rare occasions, I whisper a prayer to “God, if you are there.” Call that hope.

    Anyhow, despite having thought about God for years, I don’t think I ever put my finger on the “blackmail” aspect of so-called “free choice” until I read this post. I recall having discussions with clergy on the subject, when I questioned how we could possibly have free choice when you’d be an imbecile to choose hell over heaven, they out-thought and out-talked me with whatever the party line was. I think it ran along the lines of “you have to pray for grace to accept it, and not everybody gets it because it’s a gift.” I went away unsatisfied, but at least quiet.

    In this post, here comes Islaskye, with my wake-up call in the example of mommy controlling the little girl’s choice of clothes. I agree that children need guidance as they learn to dress themselves, and maybe the manipulative “choice limiting” is acceptable when dealing with that issue. On the other hand, maybe not.

    I can clearly remember an incident when I was 5 years old, where mommy and I went shopping for a new outfit for me. It came in either turquoise or red. My mother asked which I wanted. I chose red. “Oh, dear, babies choose red. Don’t you want to be a big girl,” asked my mother. So of course, I swithced my answer and then said turquoise.

    It took me many decades to get over wondering what my mother would want me to choose, but eternal damnation would not be a consequence if I got it wrong. That’s my personal issue. It certainly does illustrate your point. Having quit the Roman Catholic church all those years ago, it took me a good 20 years to quit thinking I would go straight to hell for having quit.

    Blackmail by parents is somewhat acceptable; they are just people doing the best they can on a temporary rather than eternal scoope. Blackmail by religious leaders is about the lowest thing I can imagine. (No, wait, pedophilic clergy are worse.)

    Thanks, Islaskye, for articulating the illusion of free choice the way you did. I found it helpful and inspiring.

    PJ Carz

    March 19, 2008 at 10:36 pm

  17. Hi PJ

    I’m glad this post struck a chord with you.

    I liken the Christian God to a mugger who holds a gun to your head and demands your money. If you hand over your wallet he’ll let you go on your way, but if you don’t he’ll blow your brains out. That’s the kind of “choice” the heaven or hell scenario gives to people.

    The fact that it took you 20 years to get over the fear of going to hell for rejecting Roman Catholicism speaks volumes about the damage that religion can do to a person’s psyche. It’s great that you’re free now.

    islaskye

    March 21, 2008 at 5:12 pm

  18. What is a more glorious freedom than from this thing that calls itself “God” but is in the end obnoxious to proclaim itself higher than anything else. Through this supposedly true deity, choice and freedom are indeed illusions, but it can simply turn itself around and say, “Well it’s not my fault that I am powerful enough to create the metaphysical laws that dictate you setting yourself upon this path and created Hell to punish just such dissenters.”

    I would say that most gods are fickle and insecure children that they demand worship with the threat of punishment at the slightest slip-up, but none so much more prominent than the Christian God.

    I’m willing to stake it is only the promise of eternal life or the fear of everlasting damnation or, dare I say, the fear of our own inevitable expiration date that anyone would willingly worship he. There is no love or understanding in such a relationship, only misery and fear.

    Reason is the only gate by which the mind is set free and the heart put at ease.

    Nidhogg

    June 7, 2010 at 3:51 pm

  19. i find this article interesting, but it is also flawed…
    let me explain myself… referring to your final paragraph, yes i do agree that there is a ‘framework’ that limits our decisions… so according to your logic, there is no real freedom in actions… like i cant choose to be able to fly… this’framework’ (aka laws, rules, ect.) is what keeps us safe and in existence… a possible equivalent that we can relate to is the way government is set up… i am from america. Therefore, according to american law, i cannot legally murder another human. this law, or as you put it “framework” is set up to protect everybody from killing everybody… does this make sense? and referring to your last paragraph again,

    “a framework that manipulates the outcome to achieve the framer’s desired result”

    this is well said, congrats… you’ve just accurately described the function of rules and laws!!! i have not seen many people successfully accomplish this. the only thing i would change about it is “…the outcome to attempt to achieve…” although i am not sure my change would result in correct grammar… but hopefully you get my idea

    now just imagine your country, wherever you are, what would happen if everybody started complying outside of your country’s framework (laws) it would go into total anarchy and chaos… rules are set up to protect

    imagine raising a child, and the framework you set up is to protect him from getting hurt… but he is able to defy those rules and get injured…or sometimes not get injured, but the outcome of his actions result in him making his own framework according to which he would live by and learn from.

    the same concept can be applied to god, he has set up the rules to “manipulate” us to not hurt ourselves and to get along and to love eachother for that is what he is; god is a god of love.

    but our world is not what it should be if we were only able to act within this framework. our world is corrupt and evil BECAUSE people have acted OUTSIDE the so called framework

    i hope this brought clarification… but i am sure this does not change your position. i respect your position. but you must understand that i can do whatever i want, whenever i want, no matter what i want if it is within by abilities and or reach… and that may be considered outside the framework

    -cheers

    mcmanly

    July 15, 2010 at 7:24 pm

  20. dont get me wrong, i did enjoy your article and i did find truth in it. i am just pointing out that limitations are required to have order and god likes order… but limitations can be exceeded and that creates chaos…. therefore, if chaos exists so does limitations that are excceded

    -cheers

    mcmanly

    July 15, 2010 at 7:32 pm

  21. This is what we do. We are simple creatures, seeking a place to find answers. Frameworks provide us a sense of control or at least the illusion of control. Within such frameworks we can build an entire universe of explanations and common understanding. Christianity, or more appropriately, religion is one of these, but they are endless.

    You can see the same attempts in science, physics, economics, government, politics and other “man created” systems of thought whether translated into law/moral code or not. I would argue that testing the parameters/rules/laws within our created frameworks is a healthy thing to happen. Entire frameworks, methods of thinking and ways of living have been torn down and build anew thanks to those who are unwilling to accept them and make their voices heard.

    It is our humanness, our reason, that brings out the best in us. Asking the big questions and trying to build a framework to support our answers is out best gift. There are people much smarter than anyone who wrote here or who is ever going to read this that debate whether the universe is a system of sheer chaos (random action) or whether it is an organized and logical system (choice).

    But to the original writers, point, faith is healthy. That isn’t an argument, it is a fact supported by factual data. Much like those who are positively effected by a placebo in a study, it has been proven that those who have a strong faith achieve things others cannot. Does it matter? No. Who cares? Our moral convictions are ultimately tied to our perceptions. Those perceptions shape our reality. Too often we forget that we can shape the world into what we want it to be. Religion, faith, Christianity, for better or for worse, shows us that it has and still can. The tragedy taking place today isn’t that people believe in false frameworks. The tragedy today is that not enough people believe strongly enough to do something to change their world and those that have that conviction have seen and understand so little.

    Finally, believing is not stupid. Believing, with one’s heart and soul in something, anything, is not ignorant. It may be what is most valuable to us if we’re going to evolve and become more. Challenging established frameworks, the beliefs/rules/laws set therein, is equally important. Get off your high horse. You and I, we’re not God, if there is indeed a one God. And if we were, chances are we wouldn’t take the time to explain ourselves to those incapable of accepting such a possibility, don’t ya think?

    Just Chris

    August 17, 2010 at 10:40 pm

  22. IslaSkye
    wrote: In the same way, God limits our options to ensure that our choices correspond to his own predetermined outcomes for us. “God didnt limit our options cause we dont have any options/choices IslaSkye!” God said “dont do this and do that” ;this is a command not an option/choice. you think if God says wear the blue dress & you decide/choose to wear jeans that you had a choice and that it was YOU that picked the jeans? no,no,no, this is the biggest downfall of mankind,hes failed this test from the beginning! you dont choose anything,God is in control of everything; God kills & makes alive,God wounds & heals! Man can do nothing of himself; God does it all. For mankind to say that he has a choice/option/alternative hes only blinded and even his blinding is down by who,thats right, GOD. How can we actually believe such a thing,sounds absurd right? Thats the key,TO BELIEVE is the key. To believe is not choice; choice is not belief. Choice implies we (humans) have the last say when it comes down to doing anything whether it be good or bad. Choice implies that we have control,we are given the option to do anything. Choice implies that God is not in control but we are. Choice says we did this,we do that, we are ultimately responsible for doing good or evil. Belief implies God is in control. Belief implies that God is authority over all things. Belief implies that God gets glory for everything. Belief says that God is supreme and we can do nothing without God. Choice implies pride. Belief implies humility.

    eric

    December 5, 2010 at 7:51 pm

  23. kavala

    holidays

    August 27, 2012 at 12:56 am

  24. Your living space is not limited by the square footage
    of your house. Of course, given sufficient time, we get used to the switching
    arrangement. You could take some pictures of the traditional ceiling
    fans you like – most shops won’t mind so long as you ask permission first.


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

%d bloggers like this: