The Mutt’s Nuts

Where religion is about as attractive as a two week holiday in Afghanistan

This tragedy is a miracle

with 9 comments

No doubt you’ve heard or read about the 11-month baby who survived the tornado that occurred in the southern US earlier this week. As usual, God got the credit. The boy’s grandfather declared: “It’s a miracle they ain’t both gone. We’ve had some divine intervention.”

Now, I can well understand the joy and relief Kyson’s family must have felt to discover him alive. It’s wonderful that he survived. But his young mother died. And that’s a tragedy.

If God is to be thanked for protecting the baby, is he not also to be blamed for not protecting the child’s mother? You can’t have it both ways.

While the tornado was carrying Kyson to safety, little children all over the world were dying. On average, 26,000 children under the age of 5 die every day. Where was God when they needed him?

Isla

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Written by islaskye

February 9, 2008 at 8:18 am

9 Responses

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  1. God does what God does. We should not question why. There is a reason for everything he does. Only He knows the reasons. We must just accept His judgements.
    It is often said only the good die young. When we die it is God harvesting us. Just as the farmer harvests crops when they are ripe, God harvests us when we are ripe.

    tommy49646

    February 9, 2008 at 8:49 am

  2. God likes publicity. He intervenes only when news cameras are around.

    CV Rick

    February 9, 2008 at 10:54 am

  3. I believe every one has a purpose or a mission in life. Some live long lives with many milestones. Others live only a short time. Our mission can be as short as a minute and as long as a century. Sometimes He intervenes, protects and saves us if it’s not our time. But is omnipotent and omniscient. And He loves endlessly. It is not our place to judge when it is someone’s time. One thing is for sure – we all will die. But, we will all be given eternal life. This is what I believe.

    kookala

    February 9, 2008 at 7:27 pm

  4. Tommy

    God does what God does. We should not question why. There is a reason for everything he does. Only He knows the reasons. We must just accept His judgements.

    You have to believe that God’s reasoning is incomprehensible in order to maintain your belief in an all-knowing, all-loving deity in the light of the terrible things that happen in the world. 26,000 babies and children dying every day, for instance. This makes no sense to a rational, moral human being who believes that their deity could step in and ease suffering whenever he wanted to, so you have to persuade yourself that he has a jolly good reason for not doing so. However, because you can’t, for the life of you, think of such a reason, you have to maintain that God’s logic is unknowable to us lesser mortals.

    You are making a poor excuse for not facing up to difficult questions, even though the scriptures clearly say that you should “seek” and you will “find”, “ask” and you will “receive”. I suspect you know that, even if you do seek and ask God what the hell he is doing by protecting one child and leaving thousands of others to perish horribly, you won’t get an answer. Because there is no reasonable, moral and compassionate answer to that question. So you have to fall back on the “cop-out” position of “We shouldn’t question, because God knows best”.

    You have to convince yourself that God has a purpose, that he’s “harvesting” little babies because they are “ripe”, even though you haven’t a clue what that actually means. And what about their grief-stricken parents and siblings? And what about little children who are orphaned by disease or famine and will never again know the comfort of a mother’s arms around them, or a father’s encouraging smile? Why shouldn’t we question how a supposedly loving God can preside over a world filled with so much loss, grief and loneliness? Why he would choose to “bless” a few and abandon so many?

    CV Rick

    God likes publicity. He intervenes only when news cameras are around.

    Funny that – it seems such a human thing to do.

    Kookala

    I believe every one has a purpose or a mission in life.

    Well, that’s a nice, comforting thing to believe, but it doesn’t mean it’s true. Just as it’s nice to believe there’s an omniscient, omnipotent, loving God watching over us and stepping in to protect and save us if it’s not our time to die. But of course, there’s no evidence that this belief is correct either.

    I presume, if you think God’s got everything in hand – if he’s given us all a purpose or mission and will ensure that we live long enough to fulfill it – that you only pray to give thanks, never to ask for safety or protection for yourself or your loved ones. After all, why would you need to ask, if God’s already got it all arranged? Whatever he wants to happen will happen regardless of any requests you might have. Just leave everything to God. It’s a great excuse for not taking responsibility.

    Sometimes He intervenes, protects and saves us if it’s not our time.

    The implication of this is that, if a baby, child, young woman or elderly woman is tortured, raped and killed, then it must be their “time” to die and therefore God is standing by and allowing those things to happen. In effect, if God does not intervene to protect and save, he is condoning those actions and giving his permission for them to be carried out. Is that what you really believe? What would you do if you saw a child being stabbed or strangled? Would you attempt to step in and help them? And would that make you more moral than God?

    islaskye

    February 10, 2008 at 10:34 am

  5. Isla,

    ***What would you do if you saw a child being stabbed or strangled? Would you attempt to step in and help them?***

    I can just imagine the self-talk that would be going on inside Kookala’s head…

    “Should I step in? But what if it’s God’s purpose for the child to be stabbed or strangled? I don’t want to be seen as attempting to thwart his purposes. What should I do? Perhaps I’m meant to help the child, though? Why else would I have been brought to this place and time if I wasn’t meant to step in? I’ll call the police and scream for help. Yes, that feels right! But what if this is all a test of my faith and, therefore, what I should really be doing is leaving it all in God’s hands? If the child survives, it’s his will. And if the child dies, that’s his will as well. It’s a win-win situation, surely? But what if I don’t help and I was meant to? Does that mean that I’ve failed in my mission somehow? I’m so confused. I want to do the right thing, as judged by God. Should I just stand here? Maybe God is trying to tell me something, but I’m just not listening. Is he helping me understand what it means to be him, like Abraham when he was asked to sacrifice Isaac? Yes, yes, that’s good. But… Oh what should I do?”

    Curmudgeonly Yours

    February 10, 2008 at 11:16 am

  6. Interesting thoughts. But really. If you see someone in danger, or about to be harmed, you should help.

    Faith is really the abiding principle in any relationship with God. You can choose to believe or not to believe. There have always been believers and non-believers. Can’t argue with history.

    You have to consider that there is free will. We have the freedom to chose what we believe, what we will do. It all fit’s in with God’s will too. I think it’s all a bit confusing. But the bottom line for me is faith. God let his Son die. But there was a purpose in that. I (we) have a savior and he atoned for me and all my sins, and sorrows. Notice that it’s about sorrows too. This life isn’t meant to be easy. Hello? Test and trials are a normal part of life. If I didn’t have those, then I wouldn’t know joy. There has to be opposition in everything. Good and bad. Pleasure and pain. Virtue and vice. It’s part of learning. It all comes back to faith. Do I believe?

    And Curmudgeonly, I’ve never had those thoughts. The only reason I would feel that I’ve failed my mission is if I had sinned and done something wrong. I’ve got my own list of questions for God. Trust me. Read my blog.

    kookala

    February 10, 2008 at 5:34 pm

  7. Kookala

    Faith is really the abiding principle in any relationship with God.

    I like Sam Harris’s definition of faith: that it is “nothing more than the license religious people give one another to keep believing when reasons fail.” I think faith could also be described as the failure to accept reality, or the effort to make reality more palatable.

    You have to consider that there is free will. We have the freedom to chose what we believe, what we will do.

    Not true. People may be able to choose, but they don’t choose freely. For an explanation of this, see my post The Illusion of Free Choice.

    This life isn’t meant to be easy.

    How do you know that? Just because your life might not have been easy, it doesn’t mean everyone’s life should be hard. Life is just life. It is what it is. It isn’t meant to be anything. It’s just life. And people’s lives are made up of good and bad experiences. It’s how we deal with those experiences that makes life easier or harder.

    IslaSkye

    February 10, 2008 at 7:22 pm

  8. Life isn’t meant to be easy. Scripture talks about it EVERYWHERE. God said he would try his people. I’m sorry that we disagree. But that’s your choice and my choice to believe how we want. My experience with faith isn’t “to keep believing when reasons fail.” Actually, I have felt many answers to questions and problems. Sometimes they come, sometimes they don’t. When they don’t, then I still chose to believe. It’s simple for me. I try not to complicate it too much. Why would I abandon my faith just because I didn’t get an answer, or feel direction in my life? That’s not the kind of relationship I chose to have. I just feel better when I am close to God. Trust me, I’ve tried running the other direction. All I felt was misery. The only true place I feel solace is when I’m lined up with faith and a belief in God. Just my experience.

    kookala

    February 11, 2008 at 4:27 pm

  9. Kookala

    You say that you still choose to believe in God, even when you don’t get answers or direction. My experience has been different. I found that my answers and direction came when I cast faith aside and stopped believing in God. I’m much happier now than I ever was as a believer. That came as quite a surprise at first, but when I thought about it, it wasn’t so hard to understand. I realised that faith would never bring answers I could trust because it’s not built on anything real. It’s just wishful thinking. I found that I could only start to see things clearly when I discarded the lens of faith through which I had viewed everything and began to understand and accept things as they really are. It wasn’t easy at first to lose the safety net of belief in a loving Father who watched over me and cared about me. But I soon discovered it was the best thing that could have happened. Rejecting God allowed me to put my own personal sorrows and losses into a clearer perspective and handle them without the pressure of my previous belief system. I was able to stop looking for reasons and just accept that stuff happens to all of us and it’s mostly random, not personal.

    IslaSkye

    February 11, 2008 at 8:23 pm


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